Category Archives: Missing Persons Bureau

There’s something happening on Facebook right now

People are tagging one another with a list of “25 Random Things” about themselves and asking their friends to post their own lists on Facebook.   I couldn’t think of anything interesting about myself, so I came up with “25 Not-so-random Things” for The Salvation Army instead. The list is a collection of historic, unusual or larger-than-life factoids that may teach you something new!

1- Founded by William and Catherine Booth in 1865, The Salvation Army is an international church and provider of services to meet the physical and spiritual needs of people in 116 countries around the globe.

2- The Salvation Army was one of the first major churches to ordain women. Founder William Booth’s wife Catherine was an ordained minister with the organization and a famous preacher in her own right.

3- The phrase “on the wagon” was coined by men and women receiving the services of The Salvation Army. Former National Commander Evangeline Booth – founder William Booth’s daughter – drove a hay wagon through the streets of New York to encourage alcoholics on board for a ride back to The Salvation Army. Hence, alcoholics in recovery were said to be “on the wagon.”

4- WWI and WWII soldiers have fond memories of The Salvation Army offering them complimentary donuts and coffee during wartime while another service organization was charging them 5 cents.

Click here to see 5 through 25 on my Facebook page.

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Filed under History, Missing Persons Bureau, Salvation Army Red Kettle, Service

Little known Salvation Army program reunites lost loved ones

A Panama City, Florida newpaper reported on a sweet story involving Daphne Clark and her brother David.

Separated for 52 years, The Salvation Army’s Missing Persons Service reunited them more than ten years ago.  Daphne is so grateful for the service that she made a generous gift to the Panama City News Herald’s Empty Stocking Fund in remembrance.

The Army’s service in this area of need began in England in the late 1880’s during the Industrial Revolution as young men and women started moving away from their families to find work in the big city.  Families, distraught with worry would often contact The Salvation Army for help finding “lost” sons or daughters.

The internet has made it easier for many of us to find old friends or colleagues. But when someone is searching for a family member that may or may not want to be found, it’s nice to have the staff of the Missing Persons Service act as intermediary.

If you or anyone you know needs help from The Salvation Army’s Missing Persons Service, please click here.

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Filed under Missing Persons Bureau, Service